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July 2015 Events


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    10. 7 CESSI Lecture: "Begging Bowls, Exuberant Feasts, & A Donkey's Tomb: Sufi Appearance, Connection to Shrines, & Place in Folklore in 19th Century Asia" Timothy Rowe
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    12. 9 Madison Public Library Russian Storytime
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    14. 11 Madison Early Music Festival Concert Series: Rose Ensemble
    15. 12 Madison Early Music Festival Concert Series: East of the River
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    17. 14 1. CESSI: "Intentional and Unintentional Use of Language and the Shift in Language Identity" Mahire Yakup 2. South Madison International Community Night
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    19. 16 Madison Public Library Russian Storytime
    20. 17 Madison Early Music Festival Concert Series: Ensemble Peregrina
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    24. 21 CESSI Lecture Series: "The US, Russia and Bridging the East-West Divide" Ian Kelly
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    26. 23 Madison Public Library Russian Storytime
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    31. 28 CESSI Lecture Series: “The Golden Horde and the Rise of the Central Asian Khanates” Uli Schamiloglu
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    33. 30 Madison Public Library Russian Storytime
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CESSI Lecture Series: "Begging Bowls, Exuberant Feasts, and A Donkey's Tomb: Sufi Appearance, Connection to Shrines, & Place in Folklore in 19th Century Asia"

Timothy Rowe, PhD Candidate, Dept. of Languages and Cultures of Asia, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

When: Tuesday, July 7, 4:00pm

Where: 2190 Grainger Hall

Sponsors: Central Eurasian Studies Summer Institute

 

About the speaker: Timothy Rowe works for the Department of Defense and lives in Ankara, Turkey. He is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Languages and Cultures of Asia where his dissertation research is focused on Sufism in 19th century Central Asia.

 

About the lecture: With a few notable exceptions, the study of Central Asian Sufism in the 19th century is relatively underdeveloped. Though scholars have done much to demonstrate the role of Sufis in the social, cultural, economic, and political life of the region in this period, no attempt to provide a comprehensive picture of what Sufism “looked” like has yet been undertaken. This talk will illuminate parts of that picture, providing glimpses of Sufi dress, connection to shrines, and their place in local folklore.

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Madison Public Library Stories and Songs in Russian

 

When: Thursday, July 9 - Thursday, August 6, 10:00am to 11:00am

Where: Madison Public Library - Central, 201 W. Mifflin Street

Sponsors: Central Eurasian Studies Summer Institute

 

For additional information or inquiries, please contact Tammy Pineda at (608) 266-6345

 

Please click here for a link to the Madison Public Library's website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Madison Early Music Festival Concert Series: Rose Ensemble

 

When: Saturday, July 11, 7:30pm

Where: Mosse Humanities Building, 455 N. Park Street

Sponsors: Madison Early Music Festival; Center for Russia, East Europe and Cenral Asian Studies

 

About the event, "Slavic Wonders: Feast and Saints in Early Russia, Bohemia and Poland":

We invite you to visit these ancient places and more, where mysterious chants, joyful hymns and magnificent choral works are mingled with tales of folk heroes. Slavic Wonders includes stunning 12-part Baroque motets from the Russian Orthodox tradition, Medieval Latin chants for Slavic saints and powerful double-choir works from the Polish Renaissance. With repertoire and a stage presence hailed by presenters and audiences as ethereal and captivating, and a vocal blend and range called “supernatural” by the critics, The Rose Ensemble has presented this program to capacity crowds across the U.S. and Europe.

 

To learn more about the Rose Ensemble, please click here.

For ticket information and further information about the festival, please click here.

 

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Madison Early Music Festival Concert Series: East of the River

 

When: Sunday, July 12, 7:30pm

Where: Mosse Humanities Building, 455 N. Park Street

Sponsors: Madison Early Music Festival; Center for Russia, East Europe and Cenral Asian Studies

 

About the event, "Levantera":

In the spirit of the program’s title,Levantera, East of the River explores Medieval music of the Mediterranean and travels eastward through the Balkans to Armenia and the Middle East, exploring the earliest songs of those extraordinary cultures, together with their traditional dances — the origins of which go back centuries. In this program East of the River lends its innovative blend of sounds to a fascinating and beautiful repertory much of which is little known to today’s audiences.

 

To learn more about the East of the River, please click here.

For ticket information and further information about the festival, please click here.

 

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CESSI Lecture Series: "Intentional and Unintentional Use of Language and the Shift in Language Identity"

Mahire Yakup, Assistant Professor of World Languages, Litereature and Culture, Nazarbayev University

 

When: Tuesday, July 14, 4:00pm

Where: 2190 Grainger Hall

Sponsors: Central Eurasian Studies Summer Inst itute

 

About the speaker: Mahire Yakup, who has a Ph.D. in Linguistics, from the University of Kansas, is an assistant professor of world languages, literature, and culture at the School of Humanities and Social Science at Nazarbayev University, in Astana, Kazakhstan.  Her research focuses on the processing of prosodic information in native and non-native Uyghur speech.

 

About the lecture: This talk will introduce the social aspects of code-switching among Uyghur-Mandarin Chinese bilinguals. First the lecture will briefly introduce the linguistic aspects of code-switching in Uyghur-Mandarin Chinese bilinguals, then it will turn to social aspects including language use and language identity. The case studies will present examples of three generations concerning code-switching to compare those speakers of Uyghur who had a Chinese educational background compared to those who had a non-Han-Chinese educational background.  The intentional and unintentional use of code-switching in regular life demonstrates a shift in language identity among the Uyghur community. Code-switching evolves from being a fashion or a way to compensate for a lack of appropriate terminology at the beginning to a stage of habituation  and normalization at the end.

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The 2nd Annual South Madison International Community Night

 

When: Tuesday, July 14, 5:00pm

Where: Villager Mall Grounds, 2222 S. Park Street, Madison, WI 53713

Sponsors: The Urban League of Greater Madison, South Madison Partnership and Wisconsin International Outreach Consortium at UW-Madison

 

About the event: This is a free and public event, featuring:

 

 

For more details contact: wioc@wioc.wisc.edu.

 

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Madison Early Music Festival Concert Series: Ensemble Peregrina

 

When: Friday, July 17, 7:30pm

Where: Mills Concert Hall, 455 N. Park Street

Sponsors: Madison Early Music Festival; Center for Russia, East Europe and Cenral Asian Studies

 

About the event, "Filia Praeclara: Music from Polish Clarissen Cloisters (13th & 14th c.)":

St. Clare, devoted follower of Francis of Assisi, was canonized by the Roman Catholic Church in 1255, gaining permission from the Vatican to live a convent life in perpetual poverty, as Francis had done. There were a number of Polish convents of the Order of St. Clare in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. This rare program offers a glimpse into the musical (and hence spiritual life) of those communities based on some surviving copies of the “Magnus liber” that belonged to Kinga of Hungary (1224-1292) and is now located at the Stary Sacz monastery in southern Poland.

 

To learn more about the Ensemble Peregrina, please click here.

For ticket information and further information about the festival, please click here.

 

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CESSI Lecture Series: "The US, Russia, and Bridging the East-West Divide"

Ian Kelly, Ambassador-in-Residence for the Midwest


When: Tuesday, July 21, 4:00pm

Where: 2190 Grainger Hall

Sponsors: Central Eurasian Studies Summer Institute

 

About the speaker: Ian Kelly is the State Department's Diplomat in Residence for the Midwest. He is a career Senior Foreign Service Officer. From March 2010 to September 2013, he was the U.S. Ambassador to the Organization for Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). He has also served as Director of the Office of Russian Affairs (2007-2009) and State Department Spokesman from 2009 to 2010. On March 12, 2015, President Obama nominated Ian Kelly to be the next U.S. Ambassador to Georgia. Ambassador Kelly has a Ph.D. from Columbia University in Russian Language and Literature..

 

About the lecture: Coming Soon!

 

 

 

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CESSI Lecture Series: “The Golden Horde and the Rise of the Central Asian Khanates”

Uli Schamiloglu, Dept. of Languages and Cultures of Asia, University of Wisconsin-Madison


When: Tuesday, July 28, 4:00pm

Where: 2190 Grainger Hall

Sponsors: Central Eurasian Studies Summer Institute

 

About the speaker: Uli Schamiloglu received his B.A. from Columbia College in Middle East Languages and Cultures and his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University in History. He is a professor in UW- Madison's Department of Languages and Cultures of Asia. Dr. Schamiloglu taught as a lecturer and assistant professor in the Department of Uralic & Altaic Studies (now the Department of Central Eurasian Studies) at Indiana University-Bloomington from 1983-89. He joined the department of Slavic Languages at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989 and, beginning in 1996, was instrumental in the development of the new Department of Languages and Cultures of Asia. Dr. Schamiloglu has been chair of the Central Asian Studies Program since 2002 and director of the Center for Middle East Studies since 2006.

 

About the lecture: In the 13th-14th centuries the Golden Horde state ruled over a vast territory stretching from Lake Zaysan in the east to the territories of Eastern Europe. With the collapse of the Golden Horde in the second half of the 14th century, we see a period of civil war followed by the rise of a series of smaller states. In the steppe regions of Central Eurasia this includes the state of the nomadic Uzbeks, the Nogay Horde, and the Kazakh khanate. This lecture will review the basis of the socio-political and economic life of the sedentary and nomadic regions of the Golden Horde territories and the reasons for its collapse. It will then turn to an examination of the rise of new states in Central Asia and how they emerged from the Golden Horde.

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