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October 2014 Events


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"The Nazi Occupation Monument in Budapest: Holocaust Memory in Hungary and the Problem of 'Double Occupation'"

Paul Hanebrink, Visiting Professor of Law, University of Michigan

 

When: Wednesday, October 1, 4:00pm

Where: Pyle Center, 702 Langdon St.

Sponsors: The Department of History, Mosse/Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies, Lubar Institute for the study of Abrahamic Religions, and Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia.

 

About the Speaker: Paul Hanebrink is associate professor of History at Rutgers University. He is the author of In Defense of Christian Hungary: Religion, Nationalism, and Antisemitism, 1890-1944 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2006). He is currently completing a second book A Spectre Haunting Europe: The Idea of Judeo-Bolshevism in Twentieth Century Europe, forthcoming from Harvard University press.

 

About the Lecture: Hanebrink will discuss the new memorial to the victims of the German occupation of Hungary, which was erected this year. In its composition, the monument presents Hungary as a helpless victim of German tyranny. It also presents all Hungarians—Jews and non-Jews—as common victims of the occupation. This distorts the history of the Holocaust in several important ways. But it also reflects a view of twentieth-century Hungarian history that is central to the memory politics of the current Hungarian government. The monument was designed to symbolize the moment when Hungary lost its sovereignty, which it did not regain until 1990. In this way, the monument is also tied to memory of the Communist era: the German occupation is understood as the first of two, equally totalitarian, occupations of Hungary.

 

 

 


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"Long Shadows of the Soviet Past"

Ekaterina Mishina, Visiting Professor of Law, University of Michigan

 

When: Thursday, October 2, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, First-Year Interest Groups, the Russian Flagship Program, and the Global Legal Studies Center.

 

About the Speaker: Ekaterina Mishina is a Russian lawyer and assistant professor of Law at the National Research University, Higher School of Economics. After completing an M.A. in Jurisprudence at Moscow State University Law School and a Ph.D. in Jurisprudence from the Russian Academy of Science, Dr. Mishina continued on to serve in a number of distinguished positions. Over the course of her career, she has acted as a legal advisor to the Constitutional Court of Russia, the head of the Legal Department of Russian cable company Mostelecom, and Deputy Director of the Institute of Legal Studies at NRU's Higher School of Economics. From 2002-2005, she took part in the Law-Making and Club of Regional Journalism projects of the Open Russia Foundation. She later worked on two big-scale projects for the INDEM (Information Science for Democracy) Foundation. In the capacity of either general manager or legal expert, Dr. Mishina participated in several projects for the World Bank, Ford Foundation, European Union, and USAID.

 

In addition to academic research publications, Dr. Mishina frequently contributes legal opinion pieces to the Institute of Modern Russia's website.

 

About the Lecture: Professor Mishina will address the characteristics of the Soviet past and how it affects the process of Russia's transformation, especially in the realm of criminal justice and legal reform.

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"Saving Beauty: Zoos in Wartime"

Tracy McDonald, Professor of History, McMaster University

 

When: Thursday, October 9, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

About the Speaker: Dr. McDonald is a specialist in Russian and Soviet History. Her areas of interest include social and cultural history, micro-history, film, agrarian studies, violence, and animal studies. McDonald co-edited (with Lynne Viola, Sergei Zhuravlev and Andrei Mel'nik) a volume of documents on collectivization entitled Riazanskaia derevnia v 1929-1930 gg.: khronika golovokruzheniia (The Riazan Countryside, 1929-1930: A Chronicle of Spinning Heads), Moscow, Rosspen, 1998. Her articles on peasant rebellion and on banditry in Riazan have appeared in the Journal of Social History and Canadian-American Slavic Studies as well as the edited volume, Contending with Stalinism: Soviet Power and Popular Resistance in the 1930s. She is the author of Face to the Village: The Riazan Countryside under Soviet Rule, 1921-1930 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011). In November 2012, her book received the ASEEES Reginald Zelnik Book Prize in History for outstanding monograph published on Russia, Eastern Europe or Eurasia in the field of history in 2011. Recent publications include a review article for the International Journal of Working Class History and a forthcoming article on violence and collectivization inEurope-Asia Studies. She was one of the three founding members of the independent documentary-film company Chemodan Films. Between 2004 and 2009, she participated in the making of four films including Province of Lost Film, Uprising, and Photographer. The films have been screened at juried international film festivals. Trailers can be viewed at www.chemodanfilms.com. She is currently working on two research projects. The first involves the work of Evgeny Kashirin the photographer of the aformentioned film. The second is a monograph-length history of Soviet zoos.

 

About the Lecture:McDonald's lecture will focus on her new area of research which is on the history of Soviet Zoos. The focus of the talk will be zoos at war with case studies of Moscow and Leningrad.

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Film Screening: "Marketa Lazarová"

František Vláčil’

 

When: Friday, October 10, 7:00pm

Where: 4070 Vilas Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

1967 | 35mm | 165 min | Czech with English subtitles

 

About the Film: This spellbinding, poetic, and hallucinatory tale of paganism versus Christianity in Medieval times is one of the most gorgeous epics of the 1960s. Beautifully filmed in black and white widescreen, Vláčil’’s Czech masterwork has deservedly earned comparisons with Tarkovsky. The title character (Vášáryová) is a young woman in the 13th century caught up in a feud between two rival clans that transforms her from pure innocent to violent rebel.

 

 


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"Conquering the Present: Soviet Culture in the Wake of the Stalinist Epoch"

Boris Gasparov, Professor of Russian, Columbia University

 

When: Friday, October 10, 4:00pm

Where: The Pyle Center, Room 226, 702 Langdon St.

Sponsors: Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, the University Lectures Committee, the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, AATSEEL-Wisconsin Chapter

 

About the Speaker: Professor Gasparov received his education in linguistics and musicology in Moscow. He continued his intellectual development in Tartu, Estonia, at the time when Yuri Lotman and others were making that university the world's center for original ideas about semiotics, linguistics, and literature. He emigrated to the United States in 1981 and taught at Berkeley for 11 years, before coming to Columbia where he is professor of Russian, co-chair and founder of the University Seminar on Romanticism, and a member of the Seminars on Linguistics and on Slavic History and Culture. His books range from Slavic medieval studies and comparative grammar to semiotic studies of oral speech, to Pushkin and his time, to Russian modernism and twentieth century poetry. Music remains deeply embedded in his teaching, scholarship, and personal life. His book, Five Operas and a Symphony: Word and Music in Russian Culture (Yale University Press, 2005), has received the ASCAP Deems Taylor award. Gasparov’s ongoing projects include Speech, Memory, and Meaning: Intertextuality in Every-Day Language, and a book on the Early Romantic roots of modern theoretical linguistics.

 

About the Lecture: This lecture serves as the keynote address for the annual AATSEEL-Wisconsin conference, sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literature.

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"AATSEEL Conference"

AATSEEL - Wisconsin Chapter

When: Saturday, October 11, 8:45am - 5:30pm

Where: The Pyle Center, Room 226, 702 Langdon St.

Sponsors: Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, the University Lectures Committee, the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, AATSEEL-Wisconsin Chapter

 

About the Conference:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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"Dangers of Russia's Parallel Reality"

Linas Linkevičius, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lithuania

 

When: Monday, October 13, 4:00pm

Where: Pyle Center, 702 Langdon St.

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, Madison-Vilnius Sister Cities

 

About the Speaker: Mr. Linkevičius served as minister of National Defence from 1993 to 1996 and from 2000 to 2004. He was the Lithuanian Permanent Representative to NATO from 2005 until 2011. In December 2012 he was appointed minister of Foreign Affairs.

 

About the Lecture: Mr. Linkevicius will give a few remarks on Lituanian/Russian relations, followed by a Q&A session.

 

 


 

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"Three Tales of a Faculty. East German Law Professors Under Socialism"

Inga Markovits, Professor of Law, University of Texas-Austin

 

When: Thursday, October 16, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: Global Legal Studies, with funding from the University Lectures Committee, First-Year Interest Groups, the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

About the Speaker: Inga Markovits holds the “Friends of Jamail” Regents Chair in Law at the University of Texas where she teaches comparative law and family law. Much of her written work focuses on the legal system of the former GDR. Markovits’ Imperfect Justice (Oxford 1995) traces the clash between the East- and West-German legal system at the moment of Germany’s re-unification. Her Justice in Lüritz (Princeton 2010) tells the bottom-up legal history of the former GDR from the perspective of one East-German trial court and the 40-years’ cache of records found in its cellar; it was co-winner of the Law & Society Association’s 2011 Willard Hurst Award. Markovits is currently working on a history of the Law Faculty of Berlin’s Humboldt University during the years of East German Socialism.

 

About the Lecture: “Lawyers make bad Christians,” Martin Luther said: because they are too non-committal; too “on the one” and “on the other hand;” because they value proof more than trust and money more than faith. But Socialism, too, wonted unconditional faith from all its servants. Were East German lawyer “bad socialists”? By looking at how a small group of legal professionals managed their 40-years’ tight-rope walk between the demands of their profession and the Party, Professor Markovits wants to learn what law can, and cannot, achieve under the pressures of a totalitarian state. Her protagonists were subjects of many high and low level policy decisions and left a lot of footprints in their work. But the evidence is so contradictory that one simple history tracing the course of legal academics at Humboldt University is not enough to do justice to her many-faceted materials. Instead, Markovits will tell three tales, each describing the same sequence of events: one of political submission, one of obstruction, and a third one of what happened to the belief in Socialism in the process.

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Film Screening: "A Report on Party and Guests (O slavnosti a hostech)"

Czech film series - The Play's the Thing: Václav Havel, Art, and Politics

 

When: Tuesday, October 21, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

Jan Němec | 1968 | 71 min | Czech with subtitles

 

About the Film: In A Report on Party and Guests, a pleasant afternoon outing is cut short when a few pushy intruders force a group of friends to play a round of ridiculous party games. Jan Němec’s absurdist parable on the behavior of authority figures is a landmark of the Czech New Wave of the brief Prague Spring.

 

About the Series: Václav Havel (1936–2011), the dissident and imprisoned dramatist who went on to become a world-renowned statesman as first president of the Czech Republic, changed the course of twentieth-century history by mixing theater with politics and peacefully ending communism in his country. His plays, filled with metaphor and pointed innuendo, exposed the failings of the system, and Havel became a hero in an epic struggle. This program is based on the places and people that Havel knew, from the influential Theatre on the Balustrade, where his theatrical career began, to his friendships with filmmakers of the Czech New Wave, and to his political ascendancy in Prague.

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2014 Majors Fair

 

When: Tuesday, October 21, 3:30-6:00pm

Where: Union South

Sponsors: Cross-College Advising Service, The Career Exploration Center

 

About the Event: The Majors Fair provides students with the opportunity to learn about a variety of academic programs by speaking with department representatives and advisors from over 100 majors and certificates.

 

Advisors from Cross-College Advising Service (CCAS) will also be available to answer students’ questions.


 

 

 

 


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Bulgarian Folkdance Workshop

Nikolay Tsvetkov

 

When: Wednesday, October 22, 8:00-10:30pm, doors open 7:30pm

Where: The Crossing -- Blakeman Hall (downstairs), 1127 University Avenue

Sponsors: Madison Folkdance & The Village Dance House

 

About the Instructor: Nikolay Tsvetkov is from the Pirin region and started dancing and performing at age 14. He studied at theBulgarian Choreographic School in Sofia, graduated with honors, toured with the Bulgarian National Opera, then entered the Musical Pedagogical Institute in Plovdiv where he performed with the "State Folk Ensemble Trakia."  Nikolay has also performed with the "Pirin State Ensemble for Folk Songs and Dances" as dancer, soloist, and choreographer. He continues to choreograph and teach for several  Bulgarian dance companies and has presented dance lectures and seminars both at home and abroad. Currently Nikolay is professor at South-West University Neophit Rilski(Blagoevgrad), teaching dance composition, Bulgarian Folk Dance, and teaching methods. He is author of "Tantzoviiat Folklor Na Petrich", the first Bulgarian book to research, analyze and offer dance notations of the traditional dances from Petrich, his home district. Nikolay has conducted dance seminars in Japan, Holland, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, and France. This is his first teaching tour in the U.S.  Come and welcome him to the Madison folkdance community!

 

About the Event:Madison Folkdance & The Village Dance House invite you to a Party Evening of Bulgarian Folkdance taught and led by Nikolay Tsvetkov.

 

Doors open 7:30 for warmup dancing -- refreshments welcome!
Workshop: 8:00 - 10:30
Suggested donation upon entry: $5 - $15 as appropriate for you.
Questions / FFI: Steve 608-277-9910 / salemson@wisc.edu

 

PARKING:  Due to exterior work on the building, parking is not available in The Crossing's rear lot.  It is recommended to use nearby University parking areas.  Lot 20 is on right side of Univ Ave, half-block west of Charter.  Lot 56 and Lot 54 to the south on Charter are free in the evening.  See UW parking map   http://transportation.wisc.edu/files/campusparkingmap2012.jpg for details and additional options. 

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Panel Discussion: "Conducting Research in Russia and Eurasia: What You Need to Know"

Roberto Carmack, Kathleen Conti, Kyle Marquardt, Graduate Students;
Erin Crawley, International Institute; Robert J. Kaiser, Professor, Geography;
Andy Quackenbush, International Academic Programs

 

When: Thursday, October 23, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

About the Panel: This panel discussion will be led by faculty and graduate students who regularly conduct field research in Russia and Eurasia. Topics to be addressed will include the nuts-and-bolts of arranging overseas research, including securing funding, making overseas contacts, and negotiating with the Education and Social/Behavioral Science Institutional Review Board (IRB) to conduct human subjects research. We will also discuss issues of safety and access in Russia and Eurasia today, in light of recent detentions, arrests, and expulsions of Western scholars from Tajikistan and the Russian Federation.

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"Between Ethos and the Soviet People: Mixed Marriages and Families in Soviet Central Asia"

Adrienne Edgar, Associate Professor of History, University of California-Santa Barbara

 

When: Thursday, October 30, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Mortenson-Petrovich Chair, the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

About the Speaker:Professor Edgar is an associate professor of  Russian and Central Asian history at U.C. Santa Barbara.  She received her B.A. in Russian from Oberlin College and M.A. in International Affairs from Columbia University.  Dr. Edgar worked as a newspaper reporter and as editor of an international affairs journal for about ten years before returning to graduate school to obtain his doctorate in Russian history (Berkeley, 1999).   She has held postdoctoral and visiting scholar appointments at Harvard, McGill and the Humboldt University in Berlin.  Dr. Edgar's book, Tribal Nation: The Making of Soviet Turkmenistan, was published by Princeton University in 2004. She has also published numerous articles on ethnicity and gender in Soviet Central Asia.  Currently, Dr. Edgar is completing a book about ethnic intermarriage in the Soviet Union.

 

About the Lecture: This talk investigates identities in the Soviet Union through the lens of interethnic intimacy.  Soviet authorities consistently celebrated mixed marriages as proof of the unbreakable "friendship of nations" and as a sign of the imminent emergence of a Soviet people.  In "backward" regions such as predominantly Muslim Central Asia, the communist regime saw intermarriage as a way to promote modernity and a common Soviet way of life.  Nevertheless, members of mixed families found it difficult to reconcile their multiple identities with being simply "Soviet."  Using archival and published materials as well as oral history testimony from three post-Soviet states, Prof. Edgar examines both the official Soviet approach to ethnic mixing and the subjective experiences of mixed individuals and families.

 

 

 

 



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