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April 2013 Events


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Sayfutdinova"The Dream of Craftsmanship: Change and Continuity in the Engineering Profession in Post-Soviet Azerbaijan"

Leyla Sayfutdinova , Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey


When: Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 4:00 pm
Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA), and the Robert F. and Jean E. Holtz Center for Science & Technology Studies


About the lecture: The presentation explores the changes and continuities in the engineering profession in Azerbaijan in the course of post-Soviet transformation. Baku has been an industrial city since the oil boom of the mid-19th century, and its industrial infrastructure was expanded greatly during the Soviet period. The industrial growth, sometimes considered ‘overindustrialization,’ and Soviet educational policies have made engineers the largest professional group in the Republic; the significance of Azerbaijan’s oil industry to the Soviet Union as a whole has made it also one of the most prestigious. However, after acquiring independence in 1991 this professional group faced contradictory forces: on the one hand, the disruption of industrial links that were previously sustained by the command economy left many engineers without jobs; on the other hand, the transnationalization of the oil industry and growth of the private sector offered new opportunities. Based on 40 in-depth interviews the presentation explores how Soviet-educated engineers have coped with these complex changes. The ideal of ‘craftsmanship’, understood as a creative and holistic approach to engineering tasks, from research and design to implementation, is the central idea that structures engineers’ perceptions of their profession and its value in society.

 

About the speaker: Leyla is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at Middle East Technical University (METU) in Ankara, Turkey. Her research focuses on the transformation of the engineering profession in Azerbaijan during the post-Soviet period. Presently, she is a Visiting Researcher in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

 

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Madison Symphony Orchestra: Russian Selections


 

Where: Overture Hall
When: April 5,6, and 7, 2013
 
RACHMANINOFF   The Bells  
 
   Works by Sergey Rachmaninoff will be featured as part of the final two concerts of the Madison Symphony Orchestra (MSO) season.
 
 
   The MSO will be joined by the Madison Symphony Chorus for Rachmaninoff’s “The Bells” in concerts to be presented April 5, 6 and 7. Inspired by the poetry of Edgar Allen Poe, “The Bells” is sometimes lush, sometimes fierce, and occasionally terrifying. The cantata was first performed in 1913 with the composer conducting. The April concerts also feature music by Handel, Mendelssohn and Vaughn Williams.
 
   Complete concert information can be found on the MSO website at http://madisonsymphony.org/12-13
 
   MSO concerts take place in Overture Hall at 201 State Street Fridays at 7:30 PM, Saturdays at 8:00 PM and Sundays at 2:30 PM. Concert tickets are $16.50 to $78.50, available athttp://www.madisonsymphony.org and through the Overture Center Box Office at 201 State Street, 608.258.4141. Groups of 15 or more save 25%.
 
   Seniors and Students save 20%, and the MSO’s Student Rush is good for best available seats at $10 and $15 on the day of the concert. Discounted seats are subject to availability and discounts may not be combined.

 

 

 

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Lyra Concert (Russian A Cappella): St. Dunstan's Church, Middleton


When: April 6th & 7th 2013

 

 

LYRA CONCERT, Saturday, April 6, 7pm: LYRA, an a cappella group of five professional vocalists from St. Petersburg, Russia, will present a concert of Russian choral music at St. Dunstan's Church. The first part of the concert, sacred music of Russian Orthodox church, includes works of famous masters and little-known but remarkable Russian composers of the 18th through the 20th centuries. The second part of their program is made up of Russian folk songs: comic, lyric, dancing, love songs. The concert is about an hour long. A donation of $10 is suggested at the door. CDs will also be available for sale.

 

 

LYRA SPECIAL WORSHIP MUSIC, Sunday, April 7, 10am: LYRA will also provide music during worship the Sunday after Easter.

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Russian Folk Orchestra


When: Sunday, April 7, 2013 at 4:00 pm
Where: Beloit College, Eaton Chapel

Sponsors: Beloit College Dept. of Modern Languages and Literatures

 

The University of Wisconsin Russian Folk Orchestra will present a program of Russian and other East-European folk music performed on authentic Russian folk instruments, the balalaikas and domras.  The UW-Madison Russian Folk Orchestra has been in existence since 1997 and currently includes 40 players. Vocal and instrumental soloists will also be features.

 

For more information about the orchestra visit the website at:  http://www.russorch.wisc.edu/.

 

To see the posting on Beloit College's website: click here.

 

This event is free and open to the campus and community.

 

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MoserMellon Foundation New International Studies Lecture:

“Electoral Politics in Russia”

Robert Moser, University of Texas at Austin


When: Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 4:00 pm
Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA)


About the lecture: Studies of electoral fraud in Russia have focused primarily on the detection of electoral manipulation. Based on this research, scholars have argued that Vladimir Putin’s Party of Power has maintained its majority in the State Duma largely through ballot manipulations at polling stations and altered vote counts in electoral administrative bodies. These studies have shown that fraud is more likely to occur in the country’s ethnic republics, home to much of Russia’s minority population, rather than in oblasts and krais, which are primarily populated by ethnic Russians (Myagkov, et al. 2009; Mebane and Kalinin 2009). Why does electoral fraud appear to follow ethnic lines in Russia? We argue that concentrations of ethnic minorities provide 1) greater incentives for electoral manipulation by the central state and regional elites in order to signal political dominance (see Simpser, forthcoming), and 2) greater capacity to carry out electoral manipulation through networks of local co-ethnic elites willing to carry out patronage-based mobilizations and various electoral manipulations. The patterns of electoral manipulation across and within different ethnic and economic regional contexts in the two most recent elections to the State Duma (2007 and 2011) suggest that the “ethnic component” of electoral fraud is more nuanced than previous studies have suggested. The indications of fraud were most prevalent in raions (roughly similar in size to US counties) with more densely concentrated minority populations across ethnic and non-ethnic as well as richer and poorer regions. However, multilevel analyses suggest that the extent of the fraud was strongly contingent on regional context. Fraud was indeed more likely to occur in ethnic republics than in oblasts and krais, but this regional effect was significantly higher in the more politically volatile majority-Muslim regions. Socioeconomic differences among regions, by contrast, did not affect the prevalence of fraud. The results underscore the potentially significant role that ethnicity plays in electoral manipulation in Russia.

 

About the speaker: Professor Moser specializes in the study of electoral systems, political parties, ethnicity and elections, women’s and minority representation, and Russian politics. He has written numerous book chapters and articles on democratization, elections, and political parties in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. His articles have appeared in World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Politics, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Electoral Studies, and Post- Soviet Affairs. His research has been funded by SSRC, IREX, and the Ford Foundation. He was appointed the William D. Blunk Memorial Professor for 2005-06 in recognition of his undergraduate teaching and advising and was awarded the President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award in 2002. More recently, Moser received the 2008 Harry Ransom Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Silver Spurs Endowed Teaching Fellowship in 2010. He is the author of Unexpected Outcomes: Electoral Systems, Political Parties, and Representation in Russia (2001) and co-editor, with Zoltan Barany, of Russian Politics: Challenges of Democratization (2001), Ethnic Politics after Communism (2005), and Is Democracy Exportable? (2009). His latest book, co-authored with Ethan Scheiner, is Electoral Systems and Political Context (2012).

 

 

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WFF CREECA Wisconsin Film Festival
"In the Fog" V tumane

 


Showing Number 1: Friday, April 12, 2013 at 2:30 pm at Sundance Cinema 1, Madison
Showing Number 2: Sunday, April 14, 2013 at 4:30 pm at the Chazen Museum of Art

 

 

About the film:

 

Russia, Germany, Latvia, Netherlands, Belarus, 2012

127 min, HD projection

In Russian with English subtitles

Director: Sergei Loznitsa

 

 

From the Wisconsin Film Festival website:
"A knotty mediation on wartime morality, this captivating WWII drama harks back to the classic art-house cinema of Ingmar Bergman. In the thick, inky forests of Nazi-occupied Belarus, a railroad worker suspected of being a traitor is snatched from his home by two partisans, one a lifelong friend. After falsely assuring his wife that her husband will return soon, the captors lead him to a wooded spot where the man is told to dig his own grave. A German ambush derails the proceedings, triggering a series of flashbacks that brilliantly complicate the men’s relationships and motivations. The existential weight is leavened by a certain mystical grace — the woods seem nearly alive, observing the men as they wonder at where their lives have taken them. Working again with master cinematographer Oleg Mutu (The Death of Mr. Lazarescu, WFF 2006), writer/director Sergei Loznitsa (My Joy, WFF 2011) emphasizes his characters’ philosophical quandaries through virtuosic long takes. “Beautifully rigorous… this very Russian tragedy is a jewel which will surely only burnish with time” (Screen). FIPRESCI Prize, 2012 Cannes Film Festival."

 



 

 

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WFF CREECA Wisconsin Film Festival
"Everybody in Our Family"
Toata lumea din familia noastra

 


Showing Number 1: Saturday, April 13, 2013 at 3:30 pm at Sundance Cinema 6, Madison
Showing Number 2: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 at 12:00 pm at Sundance Cinema 6, Madison

 

 

About the film:

 

Romania, 2012

107 min, DCP

In Romanian with English subtitles

Director: Radu Jude

 

From the Wisconsin Film Festival website:

"All Marius wanted to do was take his daughter Sofia to the beach. A divorced dentist in his late thirties but still living in bachelor-pad squalor, he bikes over to his ex’s place (with an enormous stuffed octopus riding in the child carrier) to pick up his five year-old for a rare weekend together. He hits an irritating roadblock when Sofia’s grandmother refuses to let them leave until his ex-wife returns from the salon. Since it’s best not to know too much about the plot beforehand, let us say that when Marius’s ex finally does show up, the already tense family dynamics veer wildly out of control. With biting dialogue and remarkable performances, the film demonstrates how desperation and emotional manipulation can drive regular people to extreme behavior. Between Everybody in our Family and The Happiest Girl in the World(WFF 2010), writer/director Radu Jude has earned a place at the forefront of the long-running Romanian New Wave. Named one of the best undistributed films of 2012 by Film Comment. “A+… a masterwork of black comedy and suspense” (Indiewire). 2012 Berlin, AFI , London, and Vancouver Film Festivals."

 



 

 

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WFF CREECA Wisconsin Film Festival
"Beyond the Hills" După dealuri

 

 


Showing : Sunday, April 14, 2013 at 5:45 pm at Sundance Cinema 6, Madison

 

 

About the film:

 

Romania, 2012

150 min, DCP

In Romanian with English subtitles

Director: Cristian Mungiu

 

 

From the Wisconsin Film Festival website:

"Cristian Mungiu’s long-awaited follow-up to his Palme d’Or winning 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days is an equally searing feminist indictment of authoritarian regimes. The gripping drama is set almost entirely within a crowded monastery in the Romanian countryside, where a group of nuns live under the control of a severe priest known as Papa. Their passive, cloistered lives are interrupted with the arrival of the headstrong Alina, who is intent on rescuing Voichita, her childhood friend and former lover. Voichita is reluctant to leave, yet Alina absolutely refuses to leave without her; the impasse causes great upheaval in the rigidly ordered monastery. As the tension slowly, unbearably ratchets, Papa becomes convinced the devil has entered his flock, and commences a terrifying exorcism. The fact that this masterful film is based on true incidents only makes it all the more vital. For their intense, almost symbiotic performances, Cristina Flutur and Cosmina Stratan shared the Best Actress prize at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. Beyond the Hills also won Mungiu Best Screenplay at Cannes, and was named one of the year’s ten best by Sight and Sound. 2012 New York Film Festival."

 



 

 

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WFF CREECA Wisconsin Film Festival

Present Tense
Simdiki Zaman

 

Showing Number 1: Sunday, April 14th, 6:00 pm at Sundance Cinema 5

Showing Number 2: Monday, April 15th, 1:30 pm at Sundance Cinema 1


Turkey | 2012 | 110 min | DCP
North American Premiere

directed by: Belmin Söylemez
writer: Belmin Söylemez, Hasmet Topaloglu


Recently divorced, cut off from her family, about to be evicted from her apartment, and, like a lot of young Europeans, finding it more than a little difficult to get meaningful employment in Istanbul, Mina has it rough. She’s planning to take any job she can get in order to save enough money and leave Turkey for the U.S. When she is hired at a café as a fortune teller who reads the dregs in coffee cups, she discovers she has the ability to offer comfort and insight to the customers who are just as lost in the wilderness as she is. While she goes through the complex preparations to depart the country, Mina begins to contemplate what it will take to get out of her depressed present tense and move into her own future happiness. An evocative first feature from director and co-scenarist Belmin Söylemez, Present Tense is a very convincing character drama that also offers a vivid portrait of contemporary Istanbul, where the centuries old shamanistic tradition that Mina practices is alive and well in many cafes, offering escape from uncertainty and anxiety.



 

 

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WFF CREECA Wisconsin Film Festival
"Two Photographs" Iki Fotograf

 


Showing Number 1: Sunday, April 14, 2013 at 6:00 pm at Sundance Cinema 5, Madison
Showing Number 2: Monday, April 15, 2013 at 1:30 pm at Sundance Cinema 1, Madison

 

 

About the film:

 

USA, Turkey, 2012

8 min, digital projection

In Turkish with English subtitles

Director: Emir Cakaroz

 

 

The story of the filmmaker's family and their immigration from Bulgaria to Turkey.

 



 

 

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ZPZolotoi Plyos Concert


 

 

 

When: Sunday, April 14, 2013 at 7:00 pm

 


Where: The Sett, Union South

 

 

Sponsors: Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA), the Russian Flagship Center, with generous support from the Anonymous Fund of the College of Letters & Science.

 

 

Zolotoi Plyos is a dynamic Russian folk trio that plays folk songs and instrumental pieces from various parts of Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, and Georgia. Their shows often include traditional dances and over 30 different instruments from the region. This event is free and open to the public.

 

 

 

 

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Kolonitskii"Kerensky as a 'Jew' and a 'Woman': Representation and Rumor during the Russian Revolution"

Boris Kolonitskii, European University in St. Petersburg

 

When: Thursday, April 18, 2013 at 4:00 pm
Where: Pyle Center, room 335

Sponsors:  Alice D. Mortenson/Petrovich Chair in Russian History, and the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA)


 

About the lecture: The annual Michael B. Petrovich Lecture honors the memory of the popular and respected professor of Russian history, whose career at the University of Wisconsin-Madison spanned the period of 1950-1988.  A specialist in the intellectual and political history of the Russian Empire, Petrovich inspired successive generations of students with his carefully crafted lectures, which combined scholarly erudition with his pioneering work in the use of visual and audio support.  In keeping with the Wisconsin Idea, he reached out to his fellow Wisconsinites through frequent public talks, broadcasts of his lectures on Wisconsin Public Radio’s “University of the Air,” and also in special television programs.  The Petrovich Lecture features leading specialists in all periods of Russian history, offering the university community and the public new insights on the history of a country and society that has intrigued outsiders for more than three centuries.  They take place thanks to the generosity of History alumna and former Petrovich student Alice D. Mortenson who created an endowed chair in his memory. 

 

About the speaker: Boris Ivanovich Kolonitskii will present the sixth annual Michael B. Petrovich Lecture at 4-5:30 on Thursday April 18 in the Pyle Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  A senior research scholar at the St. Petersburg Institute of History, part of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kolonitskii also serves as vice-rector of the European University at St. Petersburg.  Audiences in Russia and scholars around the world know him as a leading expert on the cultural and political history of late imperial and revolutionary Russia, in which he has developed new approaches to tracing the shifts in popular and elite responses to political crisis, particularly as reflected in the media of popular and street culture—cartoons, magazines, posters, and rumors.  The most recent of his four books on the period is entitled Tragic Erotica:  Images of the Imperial Family during World War I.  His presentation for the Petrovich Lecture will address his new work on the period between the abdication of Nicholas II in March 1917 and the Bolshevik seizure of power in November. 

 

 

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Conversation in Russian with Boris Kolonitskii

 

When: Friday, April 19, 2013 at 4:00 pm
Where: Room 1418, Van Hise Hall, 1220 Linden Drive

Sponsors: UW-Madison Russian Flagship

 

Boris Kolonitskii is a leading expert on the cultural and political history of late imperial and revolutionary Russia, in which he has developed new approaches to tracing the shifts in popular and elite responses to political crisis, particularly as reflected in the media of popular and street culture—cartoons, magazines, posters, and rumors. This opportunity to speak informally with Boris Ivanovich might be especially interesting to those majoring in history or other social sciences. This event will be entirely in Russian with no translation, but speakers of all levels are encouraged to attend.

 

 

About the speaker: Boris Ivanovich Kolonitskii will present the sixth annual Michael B. Petrovich Lecture at 4-5:30 on Thursday April 18 in the Pyle Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  A senior research scholar at the St. Petersburg Institute of History, part of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kolonitskii also serves as vice-rector of the European University at St. Petersburg.  Audiences in Russia and scholars around the world know him as a leading expert on the cultural and political history of late imperial and revolutionary Russia, in which he has developed new approaches to tracing the shifts in popular and elite responses to political crisis, particularly as reflected in the media of popular and street culture—cartoons, magazines, posters, and rumors.  The most recent of his four books on the period is entitled Tragic Erotica:  Images of the Imperial Family during World War I.  His presentation for the Petrovich Lecture will address his new work on the period between the abdication of Nicholas II in March 1917 and the Bolshevik seizure of power in November. 

 

For more information about Boris Kolonitskii:

Click Here

And Here

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The Rose Ensemble (St. Paul, MN)
Slavic Wonders: Feasts & Saints in 
Early Russia, Bohemia, Poland, & Ukraine


 

When: Saturday, April 20, 2013 at 4:00 pm
Where: Basilica of St. Josaphat, 2333 S 6th St Milwaukee, WI 53215



The Rose Ensemble will be performing at the Basilica of St. Josaphat in Milwuakee on Saturday, April 20th. General admission for this concert is $25; preffered seating is $40.

If you would like more information on this performance, please visit Early Music Now, and for the program of the event, click here.

 

Symposium and Reception to Honor Judith Kornblatt

 

When: Saturday, April 20- Sunday, April 21, 2013
Where: 235 Pyle Center

Sponsors:  Department of Slavic Languages and Literature


On April 20-21, 2013, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literature at UW-Madison will hold a symposium in honor of Professor Judith Deutsch Kornblatt, titled “Literature, Society, and Religion in Modern Russia.” Professor Kornblatt will retire at the end of the current academic year, and this symposium is a way for us to pay tribute to her as a scholar and as a mentor of a new generation of Slavists. We invited UW-Madison Ph.D. alumni to speak at this symposium, and we hope that this event will allow us to mark Professor Kornblatt’s retirement with an engaging series of presentations and a lively exchange of ideas. 

 

Symposium sessions will meet on Saturday, April 20, from 2:00 - 6:00 PM, and on Sunday, April 21, from 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM (235 Pyle Center). The preliminary program is attached.

 

A reception to honor Professor Kornblatt will be held on April 20th, from 6-8 PM, in the AT&T Lounge at the Pyle Center.

 

We hope to see many members of our campus community at the symposium and/or at the reception. Please join us to celebrate Judith’s contribution to scholarship, to this campus, and to the profession.

 

Click Here for the symposium program.

 

 

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CANCELED
Mellon Foundation New International Studies Lecture:

"The Power of Impossible Ideas: Ordinary Citizens' Extraordinary Efforts to Avert International Crises"

Sharon Tennison


When: Monday, April 22, 2013 at 12:00 pm
Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: Sponsored by the International Studies Major, Global Studies, CREECA, Wisconsin International Scholars (WISc) Program and the Coalition for Innovative Development, Education, and Action (IDEAco).

 

 

About the speaker: Sharon Tennison is the Founder and President of the Center for Citizen Initiatives, a nonprofit organization that implements programs to assist Russian citizens in securing economic and political reforms and fosters cooperative partnerships and relations between the U.S. and Russia. CCI’s origins date from the height of the Cold War in 1983 when Sharon Tennison led a handful of ordinary American citizens upon an extraordinary mission – challenging the dangerous barriers of fear and mistrust between the two Superpowers. The group's preposterous mission was to create an alternative to the arms race and open communications between the U.S. and the USSR. They called themselves “Citizen Diplomats.”

 

 

 

 

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Peschio"The Poetics of Impudence and Intimacy in the Age of Pushkin."

Joe Peschio, Associate Professor of Russian, UW-Milwaukee

 

 

When: April 25, 2013 4:00 pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

 

Sponsors: CREECA

 

About the lecture: The Poetics of Impudence and Intimacy in the Age of Pushkin (U of Wisconsin Press, 2012), explains how a prominent but little-understood strain of playfulness and iconoclasm in Russian literature of the early 19th century led to the massive shifts in literary convention and literary institutions that characterize Russia's so-called "Golden Age." In this talk, I'll present a summary of the book, focusing in particular on the methodologies of what I term "social philology" -- using analysis of textual variation and politeness structures to understand how micro-readerships were created and maintained.

 

About the speaker: Professor Peschio's research focuses primarily on the literary and cultural history of the Russian Golden Age (roughly, 1800-40). His current and past projects are concerned with underground literary societies, the Russian libertine tradition, literary censorship, and, more broadly, the sociology and pragmatics of Russian literature. He Hasworked as a Fulbright Fellow, State Department Title VIII Research Fellow, and University of Michigan Predoctoral Fellow at various institutions in Moscow and St. Petersburg. Professor Peschio is also the Coordinator for the UWM Slavic Languages Program. He edits a book series for Academic Studies Press called The Unknown Nineteenth Century and is an editor at The Fundamental Digital Library of Russian Literature and Folklore (Russian Academy of Sciences). He has also served on the editorial staff of the Moscow-based journal Philologica: A Bilingual Journal of Russian and Theoretical Philology.

 

 




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"How to Be a Good Socialist in North Korea: Domesticity and Reconstruction, 1953-1965"

Korea Forum with Andre Schmid, Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Studies University of Toronto

 

When: Friday, April 26, 1pm,
Where: 104 Van Hise Hall
Sponsors: Co-sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies, the Korean Studies Initiative, and the Departments of East Asian Languages and Literature and History

 

Schmid is the author of Korea Between Empires (2002), winner of the John Whitney Hall Book Prize, and the co-editor of Nation Work: Asian Elites and National Identities (2000). He has also written on key issues concerning East Asian historiography and area studies for the Journal of Asian Studies and other publications.

 

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Annual Ukrainian Banquet and Silent Auction


When: Friday, April 26, at 5:30 pm
Where: Madison Club, 5 East Wilson Street

 

FOCCUS will be having its Annual Ukrainian Banquet and Silent Auction to benefit communities located in contaminated areas of Ukraine.

 

The evening will include Ukrainian food prepared by Chef Andrew Wilson, dance by the Dnipro Ukrainain Dance Ensemble and a Silent Auction with some wonderful items ranging from dinner and entertainment around town, golf packages, resort stays, artwork, Ukrainian keepsakes and so much more.


For more information, please see this flyer.

 

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Madison Vilnius Sister Cities Annual Banquet

 

Please join us on Saturday, April 27th

for the annual Madison Vilnius Sister Cities banquet

at the Madison Club located at 5 E. Wilson Street, Madison.

Cash bar opens at 5:00 PM in the Club Room; dinner at 6:00 PM.

 

This year’s presentation will be

"President Aleksandras Stulginskis – An Allegory for Lithuania and the Singing Revolution,"

given by Dr. Jonas Juozevicius, grandson of Lithuania's former statesman.

 

Aleksandras Stulginskis was born to a poor farming family in 1885, but was destined to become a leader of his country. An agronomist by trade, he entered into politics because of his passionate views and was one of the signers of Lithuania's Declaration of Independence on February 16, 1918.

 He became Lithuania's second president, serving from 1920 to 1926.

Stulginskis withdrew from politics after his tenure, but because of his previous political career, he was deported by the Soviet Regime to Siberia along with his wife, Ona, in 1941. He was sentenced to the gulag in Krasnoyarsk and his wife to the Komi Peninsula.  When Stulginskis was released from his prison term after the death of Stalin, he joined his wife in Komi, but because of her failing health, it was another two years before they returned to Kaunas, Lithuania in 1956.

Aleksandras died there in 1969 at the age of 84, seven years after the death of his beloved Ona. He is buried alongside his wife in the Panemune Cemetery in Kaunas.

 

Dr. Juozevicius will speak about the historical perspective of his grandfather and will share personal letters and his mother's (Aldona Stulginskaite

Juozeviciene) memories of her father.  Mrs. Stulginskaite Juozeviciene is expected to attend our banquet.

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BriefingBoston, Chechnya, and Terrorism: a Faculty Roundtable


When: Tuesday, April 30, at 4:00 pm
Where: 1125 Biochemistry Building, 420 Henry Mall

Sponsors: Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

A panel of experts from the University of Wisconsin-Madison will address issues of political Islam, how the Boston bombing compares with other recent terrorist plots, and the myths and realities of the Islamic terrorist threat from the North Caucasus region of Russia. There will be time for questions and discussion.

 

Featured panelists:

 

Ted Gerber, Professor of Sociology

Andrew Kydd, Associate Professor of Political Science

Uli Schamiloglu, Professor of Languages and Cultures of Asia, Chair of Central Asian Studies Program and Middle East Studies Program

 

Moderated by:


Yoshiko M. Herrera, Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

 

 

This presentation will be recorded by Wisconsin Public Television for a later broadcast/webcast on the program "University Place."

 

 

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