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September 2012 Events


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The ASSR (Artists, Singers, and Songwriters of Russia in Madison)  presents:


Nino Arobelidze & Pablo Gordy


When:    September 8, Saturday, 7:00 pm
Where:   Tamarak Club House, 110 S. Westfield Road, Madison

Tickets $ 20, students $15

Jazz project  "Forbidden Knowledge"  will be performing in Madison on September 8th with their acoustic sets that combine pieces from the forthcoming Album release URBANISMZ as well as original compositions written prior to duo’s collaboration. 

"Forbidden knowledge"  is a concept born out of a novelty book of things people are not advised to do, but can be compelled or drawn to imagine doing.  In a nutshell, this describes the musical stylings and viable fusions that Nino Arobelidze and Pablo Gordy have put together.  Basically, the sounds say, "we shouldn't have tried this at home, because, well, it blew up."

Nino Arobelidze is a singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and voice coach whose connection to the arts started early at The Theatre Berikebi in Tbilisi, Georgia.  She moved to the US as a teenager and became enamored with jazz music, the music that thrives on self- expression and individuality. Music and movement continued to be Nino's main interests in college as she started collaborating with various artists and musicians in the Chicagoland area, specializing in global jazz and fusion; among them  a flamenco/world/fusion group Kaif and Baba Manouche, a French gypsy jazz ensemble. Her work with the Grotowski Theatre director Renee Torres inspired the all-integrating, soul-searching approach to making art which she has grown to utilize in her creative output as well as her work as an educator.

It was during her first year at The DePaul University Music School as a Classical Voice Major that she formed The CrossRoads Project, a quartet of jazz and world musicians who, along with various featured artists recorded Jigsaw in 2009, Passages EP in 2010 and Strange Brew EP in 2011. Nino's other recent projects include recording and arranging with Casa de Soul, a Brazilian folk/roots/bossa-nova; and her collaboration with the Soprano Elena Batman on Operatic Duets and Classical repertoire.


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"Obman v russkoi kul'ture."

Professor Boris Fyodorovich Egorov

 


When: Wednesday, September 12, 2012; 4:00 pm
Where: 115 Van Hise Hall
Sponsor: Dept. of Slavic Languages

 

About the Lecture: For more about Professor Egorov's research on this topic, please see this link: http://www.moscowbooks.ru/book.asp?id=613901&v=1 Russian speakers at all levels are welcome to this talk, but please note that the event will be conducted in Russian, without a translator. For more information about this event, or to make arrangements to meet with Prof. Egorov before or after the talk, please contact Prof. Andrew Reynolds: awreynolds@wisc.edu.



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Scribner

Click here to view a PDF of this poster.

"Make Your Voice Heard: Communism in the High School Curriculum, 1958-1968"

Campbell Scribner , PhD candidate, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 


When: Thursday, September 13, 2012; 4:00 pm


Where: 206 Ingraham

About the Speaker: Campbell Scribner is a PhD candidate in the departments of History and Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, studying the intersection of local and national politics in American public schools. His dissertation, “The Exurban Exchange: Local Control of Education on the Metropolitan Fringe, 1945-1980,” cites rural school consolidation as a catalyst for conservative activism during the postwar period, focusing on suburban campaigns against race-based busing, teachers’ unions, tax equalization, and secular curriculum. A longer version of his work on anti-Communist education was published in the August 2012 issue of History of Education Quarterly.

 

About the Lecture: The launch of Sputnik in 1957 sparked a crisis in American education. Congress quickly passed the National Defense Education Act, providing millions of dollars for math, science, and foreign language instruction, and by the early 1960s educators and academics began to reexamine other aspects of the curriculum as well. Their efforts prompted two changes in the social studies: one was a shift from worksheets and memorization to the investigative approach of the “new social studies,” the other a requirement that schools teach about the specter of international Communism. Insofar as the new social studies grew out of Cold War imperatives, instruction about Communism provides an interesting perspective on public perspectives of the Soviet Union and the nature of curriculum reform during the period.



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Cinematheque Film:

"Daisies"

 


Date and time: September 14 at 7:00 P.M.
Location: 4070 Vilas Hall, 821 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706

Sponsor: Cinematheque, CREECA

 

About the film:

 

Czechoslovakia, 1966, 35mm, 76 min., Czech with English subtitles
Directed by Vera Chytilová
With Ivana Karbanová, Jitka Cerhová


In this satirical, feminist, and enormously fun gem from the Czech new wave, Marie I and Marie II set out on a series of life-exploring anarchic adventures. Their episodic exploits lead to the dismantling of a number of western civilization’s tentpoles, including food, clothing, and war. Don’t miss your chance to see a newly struck 35mm print of this classic, which is, in the words of director Chytilová, ““a philosophical documentary in the form of a farce.”


 

For more about this film, check out Cinematheque's Web site at cinema.wisc.edu.

 

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Natasha's Dream

 

 


Date and time: September 14 at 7:30 P.M., September 15 at 7:30 P.M., September 16 at 2:00 P.M.

Location: Hemsley Theatre, Vilas Communication Hall

 

About the performance:

 

by Yaroslava Pulinovich
translated by John Freedman
directed by Mary McAvoy

Natasha: Ely Phan
Natasha: Catherine Cwirla



Please join us for a performance of Russian New Drama playwright Yaroslava Pulinovich's intimate, provocative plays. Written as complementary monologues, I Won and Natasha’s Dream depict parallel narratives about two sixteen-year-old women named Natasha. The plots of both dramas are quite simple: the two Natashas recount the stories of their ill-fated crushes. Despite their simplicity, these plays, as Moscow Times theatre critic John Freedman notes, offer a "teenage rebuke to society" by challenging the forces young women must negotiate as they come of age in a contemporary world. 

 

 


Seating is limited to twenty audience members per night. For reservations, please email: natashareservations@gmail.com

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Kabile

 

 


Date and time: September 19 at 7:30 P.M., September 15 at 7:30 P.M., September 16 at 2:00 P.M.

Location: The Crossing -- Blakeman Hall (downstairs parish hall) 1127 University Ave. (SE corner of Univ. & Charter St.)

 

Please ENTER & LEAVE via the direct stairs from rear parking lot

 

Suggested Donation: $5-$15 as appropriate for you -- come & enjoy!
    

Questions/FFI:  Michael  608-241-3655 / mk@mailbag.com         

    Band website:  http://balkandance.net/kabile2012/


 

About the performance:

 

Kabilé takes its name from the village in Bulgaria where the band played an early gigs. For ten years the band played almost every weekend at weddings, festivals, & holidays in Thrace. In 2007 the band reunited for a first North American tour. They are now world-renowned for their "bitov" (traditional) style of dance & song music and in demand from coast to coast.

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Gerber

Click here to view a PDF of this poster.

"Divided Historical Memory among Youth in Estonia: Ethnic, Socioeconomic, Linguistic, and Political Sources of Ideational Cleavage"

Ted Gerber, Professor of Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison


When: Thursday, September 20, 2012; 4:00 pm
Where: 206 Ingraham

About the Speaker: Ted Gerber is a professor of sociology. A member of the UW-Madison faculty since 2003, Gerber has published over 40 articles examining socio-economic stratification, education, labor markets, demographic processes, public opinion, institutional change, HIV/AIDS, and science in contemporary Russia and other former Soviet republics, primarily based on surveys he has conducted in those countries. He has received funding for his research from the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Education, the National Council for East European and Eurasia Research, and the federal Title VIII program. Gerber has served as a consultant on issues of Eurasian strategy and security for the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and Democracy International.

 

About the Lecture: In recent decades scholars and pro-democracy advocacy groups have examined the impact on democratic transitions of conflicts over “historical memory,” collectively shared and reproduced perceptions and narratives about the recent past that have political resonance in the present.  Contemporary Estonian society remains sharply split along ethnic lines in its understanding of Second World War and the Soviet period.  Professor Gerber uses data from a survey of young adults he conducted in 2009-2010 in both Estonia and Russia to identify discrete modalities of historical memory and examine the role of country of residence, ethnicity, citizenship status, demographic and socio-economic traits, language ability, and social ties in shaping adherence to particular modalities.  All of these variables have effects on the probability of adhering to particular views of the Soviet past.  Some of the effects point to potential policy interventions that the Estonian government might implement in order to reduce the divide over history.  However, the persistence of ethnic divisions in the face of extensive controls for other sources of disagreement suggests that strong barriers to reconciliation across ethnic lines will persevere. 



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After the Violence Conference:

Session 3: Making Memory in Eastern Europe

**This session will feature discussions and lectures on a variety of CREECA regions


When: Saturday, September 22, 2012; 9:00am-12:30pm
Where: Pyle Center

Session Itinerary:

Moderator: Winson Chu, Department of History, UW-Milwaukee

 

Francine Hirsch, Department of History, UW-Madison

                        "The Nuremberg Trials as Cold War Competition"

 

Karl Schloegel, Cultural Studies, Europa Viadrina University, Frankfurt/Oder

                        "The Cube on Red Square: A Memorial for the Victims of 20th Century Russia"

 

Geneviève Zubrzycki, Dept. of Sociology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

                        "Beyond Trauma, Denial, and Nostalgia: Polish Memory-Making in the 21st Century"



To see the entire conference program, click here.

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Language Institute Brownbag Presentation:
Interpreting Definiteness in a Second Language Without Articles: the Case of L2 Russian

Jacee Cho, Dept. of English


When: Monday, September 24, 2012; 12:00 pm
Where:  1418 Van Hise Hall

About the Lecture: The L2 acquisition of definiteness has been examined mainly through an investigation of the acquisition of English articles by learners whose L1 does not have overt articles (e.g., Russian). The reverse learning situation (English speakers learning definiteness in Russian), however, has not been previously studied. I will present my recent study on the acquisition of definiteness in L2 Russian by English speakers. I will discuss how definiteness is expressed in Russian, a language without overt articles, and identify learning challenges English speakers face in acquiring the meaning definite in Russian. Finally, I will discuss theoretical and practical pedagogical implications of the study.


For more information on the Language Institute and its Brownbag Lectures, click here.

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Havens Center Event:
Writing the History of a River – The Problem of Narration in Historiography

Karl Schloegel, Cultural Studies, Europa Viadrina University, Frankfurt/Oder


When: Monday, September 24, 2012; 4:00 pm
Where:  206 Ingraham Hall

About the Speaker: Prof. Schloegel holds the chair of East European History at the European University Viadrina (Frankfurt/Oder). His research focuses on Russian modernity in 19th and 20th Centuries, the Russian Diaspora after 1917, Stalinism, Urban Culture in Eastern Europe, Forced Migration in Central Europe. He has won numerous prizes for his essays and books, including the 2009 Leipzig Book Prize for Terror and Dream: Moscow 1937 on the Moscow Trials (forthcoming in English translation with Polity Press). He has published 12 additional monographs, including cultural histories of St. Petersburg and Moscow and on Russians in Berlin. He studied philosophy, sociology, and East European history at Free University Berlin and the universities in Moscow and Leningrad/St.Petersburg in the 1970s and 1980s.

About the Lecture: Coming Soon!


For the Havens Center announcement, click here.

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Havens Center Event:
"Soviet Detroit“ or How Mother Russia Became Modern

Karl Schloegel, Cultural Studies, Europa Viadrina University, Frankfurt/Oder


When: Tuesday, September 25, 2012; 4:00 pm
Where: 336 Ingraham Hall

About the Speaker: Prof. Schloegel holds the chair of East European History at the European University Viadrina (Frankfurt/Oder). His research focuses on Russian modernity in 19th and 20th Centuries, the Russian Diaspora after 1917, Stalinism, Urban Culture in Eastern Europe, Forced Migration in Central Europe. He has won numerous prizes for his essays and books, including the 2009 Leipzig Book Prize for Terror and Dream: Moscow 1937 on the Moscow Trials (forthcoming in English translation with Polity Press). He has published 12 additional monographs, including cultural histories of St. Petersburg and Moscow and on Russians in Berlin. He studied philosophy, sociology, and East European history at Free University Berlin and the universities in Moscow and Leningrad/St.Petersburg in the 1970s and 1980s.


About the Lecture: Coming Soon!



For the Havens Center announcement, click here.

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Havens Center Event:
"Open Seminar on Selected Readings"

Karl Schloegel, Cultural Studies, Europa Viadrina University, Frankfurt/Oder


When: Wednesday, September 26, 2012; 12:00 pm
Where: 8108 Social Science

About the Speaker: Prof. Schloegel holds the chair of East European History at the European University Viadrina (Frankfurt/Oder). His research focuses on Russian modernity in 19th and 20th Centuries, the Russian Diaspora after 1917, Stalinism, Urban Culture in Eastern Europe, Forced Migration in Central Europe. He has won numerous prizes for his essays and books, including the 2009 Leipzig Book Prize for Terror and Dream: Moscow 1937 on the Moscow Trials (forthcoming in English translation with Polity Press). He has published 12 additional monographs, including cultural histories of St. Petersburg and Moscow and on Russians in Berlin. He studied philosophy, sociology, and East European history at Free University Berlin and the universities in Moscow and Leningrad/St.Petersburg in the 1970s and 1980s.


About the Seminar: Shloegel's seminar will assume a background knowledge of selected readings listed below. More information will be coming soon!


Schloegel's Article: Schlögel, Moscow (London: Reaktion Books, 2005), 9-40; 67-81; 161-177)

 


For the Havens Center announcement, click here.



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Pyle

Click here to view a PDF of this poster.

"Russia's Urban Industrial Land: A Story of Gradual Reform"

William Pyle, Associate Professor of Economics, Middlebury College

 


When: Thursday, September 27, 2012; 4:00 pm

 

Where: 206 Ingraham


About the Speaker: Coming Soon!

 

About the Lecture: The scholarship on the privatization of Russian industry overlooks, almost completely, the story of enterprise land rights - a story that does not jibe well with the standard narrative of post-Soviet reform. Whereas property rights over much of the country's capital stock were privatized quickly in the 1990s, the (relatively valuable) land underneath remained almost entirely government-owned. Despite federal efforts to address the imbalance, including the Land Code of 2001, the privatization of commercial land has proceeded slowly and unevenly. Drawing on data from a survey of several hundred large industrial firms across some of Russia's largest cities, this presentation will explore the story of this slow and uneven reform, highlighting the consequences for enterprise behavior and urban development.



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